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15 million Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines were thrown away. Here’s why

Johnson & Johnson reported a COVID-19 vaccine batch was ruined in Baltimore

SHARE 15 million Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines were thrown away. Here’s why
Johnson & Johnson reported a COVID-19 vaccine batch was ruined in Baltimore.

Registered nurse Nichole Makaafi, left, receives more syringes full of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine from registered nurse Candice Wright during a drive-thru vaccination clinic at Intermountain Healthcare’s The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital in Murray on Thursday, March 4, 2021.

Spenser Heaps, Deseret News

Workers at a manufacturing plant that develop the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccineaccidentally mixed up vaccine ingredients, ruining 15 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, The New York Times reports.

  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will now have to delay shipments of the vaccine because of the error, per The New York Times.

How did the Johnson & Johnson mixup happen?

The workers at the plant — Emergent BioSolutions, a production facility in Baltimore — accidentally mixed up doses of Johnson & Johnson and the AstraZeneca vaccine, The New York Times reports.

  • Both vaccines use the same type of technology — they use a harmless version of the novel coronavirus to create antibodies in your system — but they can’t be mixed together.
  • Sometime in February, one of the planet workers confused the two vaccines.

What does this mean for your vaccine dose?

This error will “not affect any Johnson & Johnson doses that are currently being delivered and used nationwide, including the shipments that states are counting on next week,” per The New York Times.

  • All the doses currently available were produced in the Netherlands.
  • J&J said the Emergent BioSolutions lab had not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to make parts of the COVID-19 vaccine, according to NPR.
  • Johnson & Johnson told Fox Business that it still expects to follow its distribution timeline of delivering 1 billion doses by the end of 2021.