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Rep. Adam Robertson resigns from Utah Legislature

SHARE Rep. Adam Robertson resigns from Utah Legislature
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Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

Rep. Adam Robertson, R-Provo, is stepping down from the Utah Legislature weeks before the 2023 legislative session starts on Jan. 17.

Robertson was reelected for another two-year term in November after running unopposed to represent House District 60. The Utah County Republican Party announced Wednesday night that it had received Robertson's resignation.

"We express our gratitude to Representative Robertson for his many years of service," the party said in a Facebook post. "The party will announce the House District 60 Special Election process in the coming days."

Utah Republican Party Chairman Carson Jorgensen said the special election process will be held at the county party level.

"It's just a lot of logistical management. It's not a very difficult process, but it's a lot of timing to make sure legally you hit all the timing dates and really abide by what the bylaws and the state laws and where those cross each other," he told KSL NewsRadio.

Jorgensen said there will be a 14-day filing period for registered Republicans who want to run for Robertson's seat and added that whoever takes over that spot will likely be sworn in right before the legislative session starts.

"It puts them at a disadvantage, it really does," Jorgensen said. "That timing is really difficult."

Robertson is the chief technology officer at Fortem Technologies, a drone defense company he co-founded.

"Rep. Robertson has been a valued member of our body and given a unique perspective especially with his vast expertise technology sector," House Speaker Brad Wilson tweeted. "I know he will continue to contribute great things to the state of Utah and to our country as he focuses more fully on his career and company."

Robertson was nominated to serve in the Utah House of Representatives in 2018. His sponsored legislation included amendments to the state's driving privilege cards, which are available to undocumented immigrants, and a failed bill that would have eliminated school curricular fees.