clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Business Insider to host a Republican primary debate between Trump’s challengers

Trump suggested he wouldn’t debate Republican challengers for the 2020 GOP nomination.

In this Aug. 11, 2019, file photo, Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld speaks to reporters during a visit to the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa. Republican leaders in Iowa and New Hampshire are vowing to hold their presidential primary contests as scheduled, even as party leaders in other key states cancel their 2020 primaries to help give President Donald Trump a smooth path to reelection.
AP

Business Insider announced Tuesday that it will host a primary debate between all Republican Party challengers to President Donald Trump.

The list of challengers (so far) include former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh and Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld. Former South Carolina Rep. Mark Sanford, who announced his challenge to Trump last weekend, also received an invite.

Business Insider invited President Donald Trump to the debate. He has not responded, though, according to the press release.

Insider CEO Henry Blodget, politics editor Anthony Fisher and opinion columnist Linette Lopez will host the event.

“The fall presidential campaign season is heating up. But we should be paying attention to more than just the Democrats who are running for president. The political landscape has changed immeasurably since Donald Trump ran for and was elected president. It’s vitally important to have an honest conversation about what it means to be a Republican in the era of Trump; our debate will be a valuable part of that discussion,” Nicholas Carlson, global editor-in-chief of Insider Inc. said in the press release.

Business Insider will broadcast the debate on Sept. 24 on “Business Insider Today,” which is a daily online news show on Facebook. The debate would be out of the news outlet’s New York City headquarters.

Trump suggested he wouldn’t debate Republican challengers for the 2020 GOP nomination due to low polling numbers, according to The Hill.

“They’re all at less than 1 percent. I guess it’s a publicity stunt,” Trump said Monday. “To be honest, I’m not looking to give them any credibility.”