As inflation persists, certain foods and products have gone down in price despite hard economic times.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics released data that showed grocery prices dipping in March for the first time since September.

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What foods are cheaper in grocery stores? Grocery prices overall from March to April went down by 0.2%, according to CNN.

Grocery food groups that had price decreases include:

  • Fish.
  • Dairy.
  • Meats.
  • Eggs.
  • Poultry.
  • Fruits.
  • Vegetables.

The news of food prices coming down is notable, as “we’re seeing food prices at an all-time high, which is obviously very important to people,” Steve D. Morris, a director at the U.S. Government Accountability Office, said last month.

As prices continue to fluctuate from month to month, the Deseret News reported budget-friendly breakfast, lunch and dinner foods and ingredients that can be added to your shopping list.

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What foods have gotten more expensive? CNN and Better Homes and Gardens reported that while there are a couple of grocery categories and restaurant options that have dropping prices, there are some prices that have increased, including:

  • Cereal.
  • Baked goods.
  • Sugar and sweets.
  • Beverages such as soda or sparking water.
  • Butter/margarine.
  • Fast food options.
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What’s being said? “We are seeing, in some places, resistance to pricing, more resistance than we saw at the outset,” McDonald’s CEO Chris Kempczinski said, according to CNN.

While grocery prices have gone down in some areas, grocery bills as a whole are continuing to go up due to external pressures, according to CBS News.

“There have been supply chain pressures, and there have been commodity cost increases. But companies have, I think, taken price increases that exceed that,” Mark Lang, associate professor of marketing at the University of Tampa, said in March. “They are, to me, absolutely profit taking.”

Publisher of recipes on the Keeping it Simple blog, Melissa O’Leary, told U.S. News and World Report, “We have seen lots of fluctuation ... with food prices and food shortages, and the name of the game to deal with this is flexibility.”

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