American Family Survey 2020

According to new findings from the American Family Survey, about a quarter of Americans have suffered financially, and Hispanics are hurting the most.
When asked whether or not they agreed with the statement “Black families face obstacles that white families don’t,” 80% of Democrats agreed with the statement, while just 25% of Republicans concurred.
Marriage decreased slightly, but the number of people in no relationship has been climbing. That’s according to the sixth-annual American Family Survey, a nationwide study of 3,000 Americans by the Deseret News and Brigham Young University.
The most common activity couples claim is doing nice things for one another. They talk about their finances, go out together, pray with each other and have a serious argument at about the rate that they have in the past.
Fifty-six percent of respondents said the pandemic made them appreciate their partner more. “It speaks to extraordinary resilience among the American people.”
New findings from the American Family Survey show that Americans of both the Republican and Democratic parties are discussing race in high rates.
Opinion editor Boyd Matheson argues that an election victory for either candidate will require catering to the ‘heart of America’ — the American family.
American Family Survey shows similarities and stark differences between Republican and Democratic families ahead of the presidential election
While parents agree their children do just under 20% of household tasks, men say they’re carrying half the load and wives say it’s a 65-35 split.
Is there a “crisis of masculinity” in our nation? Survey findings point to real concern for America’s boys.
The American Family Survey shows bipartisan support for helping families. What other pandemic-related policies do Americans support?
Annual survey releasing Sept. 22 analyzes the socioeconomic effects of COVID-19, racial and social unrest and the health of the American family