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‘Joker’: LAPD adds visibility around theaters because of ‘historical significance’

LAPD says there have been no credible threats connected to the film.

Joaquin Phoenix as Arthur Fleck in Warner Bros. Pictures, Village Roadshow Pictures and BRON Creative’s “Joker,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
Niko Tavernise, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Los Angeles Police Department will add increased visibility next weekend to make sure people are safe ahead of “Joker” screenings, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

What’s going on: The police said there have been no credible threats connected to “Joker.” However, officers will be out ahead of screenings, hoping to avoid another incidents like the 2012 Aurora shooting and other recent mass shootings over the summer, THR reported.

  • “The Los Angeles Police Department is aware of public concerns and the historical significance associated with the premiere of Joker,’” the LAPD statement reads. “While there are no credible threats in the Los Angeles area, the department will maintain high visibility around theaters when it opens.”
  • “We encourage everyone to go out and enjoy all of the weekend leisure activities this city has to offer, however, Angelenos should remain vigilant and always be aware of your surroundings,” said police, according to THR.

Other reports: Multiple reports over the last week or so have led to increase fear and worry over a potential shooting at a “Joker” screening. It began when the U.S. military warned of a potential “incel” attack related to the screening, as reported by the Deseret News. The U.S. Army Base in Fort Sill, Oklahoma, warned service members of potential threats, citing “a credible potential mass shooting to occur at an unknown movie theater.”

Response: In response to the hysteria, Landmark Theaters called for a ban on cosplay ahead of the film.

“Joker” director Todd Phillips said he didn’t enjoy the outrage over his film.

“I think it’s because outrage is a commodity, I think it’s something that has been a commodity for a while,” Phillips said in his Sept. 20 interview with The Wrap, first published Wednesday. “What’s outstanding to me in this discourse in this movie is how easily the far left can sound like the far right when it suits their agenda. It’s really been eye-opening for me.”

Why it matters: I had multiple conversations with experts over the last week about “Joker” and the impact it could have on people. Experts mainly agree the film could be a problem if it inspires the wrong person.