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Lindsey Stirling, David Archuleta and Derek Hough want to talk about acceptance. Here’s how to join them

The entertainment stars will share their personal experiences with acceptance via a fairly new — and free — Facebook feature called Live Audio Room on Thursday night

SHARE Lindsey Stirling, David Archuleta and Derek Hough want to talk about acceptance. Here’s how to join them
Violinist Lindsey Stirling participates in AOL’s BUILD Speaker Series at AOL Studios on June 16, 2015, in New York.

Violinist Lindsey Stirling participates in AOL’s BUILD Speaker Series at AOL Studios on June 16, 2015, in New York. Stirling is hosting a Facebook conversation Thursday night with David Archuleta and Derek Hough.

Andy Kropa, Invision/Associated Press

Lindsey Stirling wants to talk about the “road to acceptance,” and she’s bringing in fellow artists and friends David Archuleta and Derek Hough to weigh in on the conversation.

The three entertainment stars will share their personal experiences with acceptance via a fairly new — and free — Facebook feature called Live Audio Room. The conversation goes live on Thursday at 8 p.m. MDT, and can only be viewed via phone.


How to watch Lindsey Stirling on Facebook Live Audio Room

People who follow Stirling, Archuleta or Hough on Facebook will likely see the Live Audio Room event at the top of their Facebook news feed. Stirling has also shared a link to the chat on her Facebook page, although that link can only be accessed through a mobile device.

Facebook rolled out its Live Audio Room feature in June. These rooms can feature up to 50 speakers, and there’s no limit to the number of people who can listen, according to the company.

Live Audio Room has a live caption feature, shows users when their friends and followers have joined the chat and has interactive ways for people to participate in real time, according to Facebook.


Lindsey Stirling on facing her critics

Stirling has been open about a number of topics over the years, ranging from her mental health struggles to her faith as a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to facing her critics.

In a 2018 interview with the Deseret News, Stirling — a dancer and violinist with millions of followers on social media — recalled how some of the judges on “America’s Got Talent” doubted her artistic style would ever take off as a career.

  • “Whatever art you’re creating, there’s going to be people that bash you,” she said. “To this day, there’s still people that think I’m a terrible violinist and think what I do is really ridiculous. I think it’s just important to remember that there’s always positive and negative around you, and it’s up for us to decide where we’re going to focus and put our energy.
  • “Consistently, whether it’s through my art or whether it’s just the way I’m living my life, I try really hard to focus on the positive, and I think that’s the key to living happy and being successful,” she continued.


David Archuleta on faith, sexuality

In June, Archuleta opened up about his sexuality and his faith as a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, encouraging people in a statement to “listen more to the wrestle between being LGBTQIA+ and a person of faith,” the Deseret News reported.

  • “I don’t think it should come down to feeling you have to accept one or the other,” the “American Idol” star from Utah said in an Instagram post. “For me to find peace the reality has been to accept both are real things I experience and make who I am. You can be part of the LGBTQIA+ community and still believe in God and his gospel plan.”


Derek Hough on being open and vulnerable

A few years ago, Derek Hough, a professional dancer who grew up in Utah, opened up about his life in a memoir titled “Taking the Lead.”

In that book, Hough — who appeared for years on “Dancing With the Stars” and “World of Dance” — shared how he was bullied as a child, handled his parents’ divorce and navigated the challenges of the competitive dance world, the Deseret News reported.

“Opening up to someone is the ultimate act of courage and faith,” he wrote, according to the Deseret News.