Since the actor Chris Pratt and his wife, Katherine Schwarzenegger, welcomed their baby girl 10 months ago, the couple’s viewing habits have changed. Now their favorite show is “‘Baby Monitor,’” joked Pratt in an interview with E! News. “It’s this new show where you just hope and pray they stay asleep all night. It’s been really great — drama, some comedy.”

Kidding aside, Pratt said that he and Schwarzenegger have had a hard time finding “the time to watch anything” since welcoming their second daughter, Eloise Christina, to the family. She joined their first child, 2-year-old Lyla Maria, as well as Pratt’s son from his first marriage, 10-year-old Jack.

And Schwarzenegger, an author, recently published a children’s book titled “Good Night, Sister.” The story revolves around two little girls who are supposed to sleep on their own for the very first time but have to contend with their fears and a big nighttime storm.

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The topic seems to hit close to home for the Pratt family, as they struggle with sleep issues like many parents do. Asked if he ever looks at the monitor and then repositions the baby at night, Pratt answered no. “If they’re asleep, they’re asleep,” Pratt told E! News, adding, “The only time I’ll ever do that is if the arm or leg creeps through the bars, ’cause you have a feeling that they’re going to break their leg off or something like that.”

Creeping out of the room without waking a sleeping baby is harrowing, Pratt said, explaining that he has a “pesky ankle that cracks like every third step” when he walks.

“I got a loud ankle and so I have to hobble out on one leg or else I wake the baby up with my rattlesnake ankle,” said Pratt, who likened exiting the room to a game of “Operation — if you wake the baby up, you get shocked.”

So, tired moms and dads, take solace: Even a guardian of the galaxy finds parenting a challenge at times.

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