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The first COVID-19 vaccine tested in the U.S. boosted immune systems. So what happens next?

When does the COVID-19 vaccine go into production? Sooner than you think

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In this May 4, 2020 photo provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the first patient enrolled in Pfizer’s COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, receives an injection.

In this May 4, 2020 photo provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the first patient enrolled in Pfizer’s COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, receives an injection.

University of Maryland School of Medicine via Associated Press

The first COVID-19 vaccine tested in the U.S. “revved up people’s immune systems” in the same way that scientists had hoped, according to the Associated Press.

“No matter how you slice this, this is good news,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the U.S. government’s top infectious disease expert, told The Associated Press.

Moderna’s vaccine found antibody responses against the coronavirus in all 45 participants in the human trial, according to AFP.

The coronavirus vaccine — developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc. — will face a tough test on July 27. It will be used in a 30,000-person study “to prove if the shots really are strong enough to protect against the coronavirus,” according to the Associated Press.

The race for a vaccine is underway in the United States, with most experts expecting one in early 2021.

Drugmakers will likely start production on potential COVID-19 vaccine doses sometime by the end of summer, health officials in the United States said on Monday.

Drugmakers have already started mass production and manufacturing of a COVID-19 vaccine, which will look to help more than 300 million people across the country, CNBCreports.

Production has started even though it’s unclear if the vaccine will work. However, the companies have started to buy necessary equipment, manufacturing space and raw materials to help create the drug.

An unnamed official told CNBC: “Exactly when the vaccine materials will be in production and manufacturing? It’s probably four to six weeks away. But we will be actively manufacturing by the end of the summer.”

U.S. health officials increased the manufacturing speed so they can produce a vaccine as soon as possible, bringing it to market once it’s proven successful.

One story last week might bring some optimism to the idea of a vaccine coming sooner rather than later.

David Rach, who became the first person to be injected with a COVID-19 vaccine in May at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, believes his vaccine experience has been positive, which I wrote about for the Deseret News. Of course, it’s unclear if he actually got the vaccine since he is apart of a double-blind study. Still, he expressed having a positive experience.

Meanwhile, Russia has reportedly completed a COVID-19 vaccine trial for humans, becoming the first country to do so, according to Forbes,

“The research has been completed and it proved that the vaccine is safe. The volunteers will be discharged on July 15 and July 20,” said Elena Smolyarchuk, chief researcher for the Russian Center for Clinical Research on Medications at Sechenov University.