The Senate narrowly approved a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill Saturday, giving President Joe Biden and his party allies an early victory that will provide help for those struggling with the pandemic, the Associated Press reports.

The relief bill passed the Senate with a 50-49 party-line vote.

The House will need to give it congressional approval next week. After doing so, the bill can be sent to President Biden for his signature. the Associated Press reports.

  • “We tell the American people, help is on the way,” said Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.
  • “Our job right now is to help our country get from this stormy present to that hopeful future.”
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So who gets a stimulus check?

The bill will provide direct payments of up to $1,400 for most Americans People who make $80,000 and couples making $160,000 will not receive a stimulus payment, according to The Washington Post.

  • Under the Senate’s bill, individuals who earn less than $75,000 and couples who earn less than $150,000 will receive checks of $1,400.
  • “That means singles making between $80,000 and $100,000 and couples earning between $160,000 and $200,000 would be newly excluded from a partial benefit under the revised structure Biden agreed to,” according to The Washington Post.

Flashback:

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Just a reminder — the original version of the bill passed by the House had income caps of $200,000 for couples and $100,000 for individuals.

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Similarly, the Trump administration got Congress to approve a $600 stimulus check back in December 2020, as the Deseret News reported. For those stimulus checks, taxpayers who earned up to $75,000 in 2019 received a $600 stimulus payment. Couples who earned up to $150,000 received a $1,200 check.

What else does the bill include?

Per Associated Press, the bill offers extended emergency unemployment benefits, and it includes more spending for COVID-19 vaccines and testing.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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