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Experts say we may never go ‘back to normal’ and we need to accept it

Experts recently said that it’s hard to find a way for us to go ‘back to normal.’

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In this July 12, 2020, file photo, visitors sit on a bench on the pier amid the coronavirus pandemic in Santa Monica, Calif. California will roast in a dangerous heat wave through the Labor Day weekend and options for cooling off may be limited by coronavirus concerns at beaches and calls for energy conservation that could limit use of air conditioning at home.

In this July 12, 2020, file photo, visitors sit on a bench on the pier amid the coronavirus pandemic in Santa Monica, Calif.

Marcio Jose Sanchez, Associated Press

Experts recently said it’s unlikely we’ll go “back to normal,”especially in the near future. But people will feel better about that fact that sooner they accept it.

What’s going on?

The coronavirus pandemic shifted almost everything we knew about our world. And our brains are hard-wired to deal with it.

  • “When both good and bad things happen, at first you feel intense emotions,” Sonja Lyubomirsky, distinguished professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, told CNN. “Then you adjust and you go back to baseline. This is much more powerful with positive events. People don’t adapt as completely to negative change in their lives.”

People are more resilient than we remember, Lyubomirsky said. People need to simply adapt to whatever’s happening and then find a way to return to the old ways.

  • “It could be to adapting to the mask as the new normal ... and then adapting back to the old normal,” Lyubomirsky told CNN.

A new now?

This is similar to what our Boyd Matheson wrote about back in March — yeah, March, at the beginning of the pandemic. He said people too often use the term “new normal.” Rather, the world is experiencing a “new now.”

  • “Remember, it is against the laws of nature and nature’s God that a storm continues forever. Even the fiercest wind, in the most violent storm, eventually subsides. Stillness follows and a moment of calm confidence comes. The most resilient of beings — human beings — adapt and move forward one ‘new now’ at a time,” Matheson wrote.
  • “While suffering will be present in what feels like a dark and discouraging national and international moment, a magnificent forward-moving morning of stillness and newfound strength will follow, bringing with it yet another ‘new now’ for all of us to embrace.”